Portland, OR, USA

©2017 BY URBAN APPEAL DESIGN. PROUDLY CREATED WITH WIX.COM

Spring Romper Hack

March 17, 2018

Turn old pajamas into a cute spring romper.

 

 

With spring right around the corner, I thought that a little romper would be perfect. This took me about 15 minutes (20 min. of setting up entertainment for the kids, 15 min. of actual sewing).

 

This is great for footie pajamas that are too short or for worn out knees.

 

My son was gifted these adorable Hanna Andersson pajamas (size 6-9 mo., 70cm by their size chart). Now that baby No. 2 has worn through them and is nearly 18 months old, I still wasn't ready to give them up. The kids successfully did their due diligence of cruising and bruising therefore the knee areas were damaged yet the rest is in perfect condition.  And... who doesn't love Hanna Andersson patterns but winces at the price? 

 

 

First I cut the sleeves off, being careful to salvage the sleeves for another use.

Next, I cut the damaged part off to make them into shorts.

  • You can cut right through the zipper if plastic. If metal, make sure to cut between teeth so your scissors are not ruined.

 

 

Then, I used scrap T-shirt material to make new sleeves and leg cuffs. 

 

I traced the sleeves from this awesome Brindille & Twig pattern using a tracing wheel (the one pictured is smooth. A traditional pin wheel, serrated or smooth all work fine). 

Note: Make sure to check the grain of your T-shirt so your sleeve stretches the correct way! You want a vertical grain, horizontal stretch.

 

I cut 1.5" strips x the length of the leg holes to make my leg cuffs, again paying attention to my grain so the cuffs stretch correctly. 

 

Then I chose to coverstitch my cuff before* sewing it together. Coverstitching is a more 'professional' looking finish, but entirely unnecessary since it requires a special machine.  A medium zigzag stitch or twin needle work perfectly too. The key is to pick a stitch/method that allows for stretch. 

 

*I recommend finishing edges of tiny sleeves (or pants) ahead of sewing them together because once sewn into a loop or attached to a garment, they are super duper teeny thus being nearly impossible to maneuver on any machine.

 

I attached my sleeves with my serger. Sew sleeve into loop first then pin and sew, careful to align armpit seams.

 

I made and attached my cuffs using this technique.

 

VOILA!

 

new sleeves + new cuffs= awesome new romper

 

 

 

 

I'd love to hear your thoughts, comments or contributions in anyway! I hope you are inspired.

 

Love, 

Ashley

 

Please reload

Recent Posts

April 27, 2018

March 17, 2018

Please reload

Archive

Please reload

Tags